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National Pesticide Information Center

npic@ace.orst.edu

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Diatomaceous Earth References

Diatomaceous Earth:

  1. Pesticide Product Information System; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Government Printing Office: Washington, DC, 2012.
  2. Reregistration Eligibility Document (RED) Silicon Dioxide and Silica Gel; U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances, Office of Pesticide Programs, U.S. Government Printing Office: Washington, DC, 1991.
  3. Bertke, E. M. The effect of ingestion of diatomaceous earth in white rats: A subacute toxicity test. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 1964, 6 (3), 284-291.
  4. IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans-Silica Summary of Data Reported and Evaluation; World Health Organization, Internation Agency for Research on Cancer: Geneva, 1997; Vol. 68.
  5. Synthetic Amorphous Silica and Silicates. Screening Information Datasets (SIDS) for High Volume Chemicals; Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, United Nations Environment Programme Chemicals Branch: Berlin, 2004.
  6. Elsea, J. R. Unpublished report, 1958, submitted to World Health Organization by Hazelton Laboratories, Inc. Toxicological evaluation of some food additives including anticaking agents, antimircobials, antioxidants, emulsifiers and thickening agents; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization: Geneva, 1974.
  7. Epstein, E. The anomaly of silicon in plant biology. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 1994, 91 (1), 11-17.
  8. Diatomaceous Earth... A Reduced-Risk Pesticide; Arizona Cooperative Extension. Pest Press 2006, 6.
  9. Lewinson, J.; Mayr, W.; Wagner, H. Characterization and toxicological behavior of synthetic amorphous hydrophobic silica. Regul. Toxicol. Pharmacol. 1994, 20, 37-57.
  10. Martin, K. R. The chemistry of silica and its potential health benefits. J. Nutr. Health Aging 2007, 11 (2), 94-97.
  11. Bhardwaj, V.; Mirliss, M. J. Diatomaceous Earth Filtration for Drinking Water; National Drinking Water Clearinghouse: Morgantown, WV.
  12. Pratt, P. C. Lung Dust Content and Response in Guinea Pigs Inhaling Three Forms of Silica. Arch. Environ. Health 1983, 38 (4), 197-204.
  13. Frequently Asked Questions - Diatomaceous Earth; Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Air Quality Division: Portland, OR, 2011.
  14. Reigart, J. R.; Roberts, J. R. Miscellaneous pesticides, solvents, and adjuvants. Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings, 5th ed.; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances, U.S. Government Printing Office: Washington, DC, 1999.
  15. Hazardous Substance Fact Sheet-Silica, Cristobalite; New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program: Trenton, NJ, 1999.
  16. Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) Substances Database; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U. S. Food and Drug Administration: Silver Spring, MD, 2006
  17. Toxicological evaluation of some food additives including anticaking agents, antimircobials, antioxidants, emulsifiers and thickening agents; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization: Geneva, 1974.

NPIC fact sheets are designed to answer questions that are commonly asked by the general public about pesticides that are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). This document is intended to be educational in nature and helpful to consumers for making decisions about pesticide use.